M4 - Moire

My initial method of adding layers of transformations to the image was to take a screenshot of the image and some elements of the Photoshop or Lightroom interface - depends on which application I had the image opened in. There was yet another visual artefact which I wanted to incorporate into my images - the characteristic pattern of the LED display, so instead of making screenshots I begun to photograph the image on the screen.

LED display grid

LED display grid

This initiated a chain of further 'discoveries' like moire pattern, which I can overlay by photographing the same image multiple times, and the really huge benefit of photographing the screen - the possibility to build a scene in front of the computer screen which becomes a top layer of the background image.

The red tape layer and the third one with the black circular shape. The moire pattern overlaps nicely.

Photographing the red tape on top of the image displayed in the screen.

Photographing the red tape on top of the image displayed in the screen.

With this method of working I can add a new layers of real objects on top of the already photographed one displayed on the screen (which I can adjust in any possible way - change tones, brightness, etc.) but what's the most important - each new layer change the structure of the previous image by adding the pattern of the screen and the moire effect. The structure of the image, its photographic 'tissue' is being redefined, shredded, chopped, mixed, and ultimately abstracted from what it was at the beginning. The physically existing recorded subject is blended with the digitally generated forms.

Here, the digital forms on my screen at work and the pattern of the display itself became a first layer.