FMP - Project developement - Full stop

I know I should now design the exhibition layout and photobook, posters, invitations etc. but I couldn’t get rid of the feeling that I am not done yet. The new, unopened box of 50 blank 16”x12” Ilford sheets of paper was also provoking and I eventually set up my mini darkroom and done what was in my head for the last days.

It was a crazy idea and I thought I will end up tired and frustrated but it turned out to be my missing puzzle. Instead of exposing the light sensitive paper with projector I thought I will try to stick the paper to my computer screen to “scan” the image. I had in my head the rounded/oval form which is in fact a full stop so I typed the 900pt full stop and positioned it centrally on the screen. I sticked the paper for a couple of seconds and placed in the tray with developer. And the full stop appeared. Beautiful, oval shape, not exactly as I imagined it but beautiful enough to get really excited. The shape was blurred but that was probably the best - the amazing gradient of the soft grey tones, from light grey to very deep blackness.

I have made some very interesting images using that new method and I think all of them are my symbolic full stop in the project. I am happy to stop now and think how to put it all together to make the work speak the way I want. Be intriguing, beautiful and thought provoking. Perhaps it is too ambitious goal for the experimental and abstract works…? Don’t know.

It is a quite unexpected outcome of the five months long search for some structure, essence, motif. I have found it, but perhaps I gone too far away in my explorations from the subject? It all does a lot of sense to me because I know the thinking process and the reasons behind every step in my journey but how it will be all perceived by the audience is a big mystery to me.

 My first luminogram exposed by the image displayed on the computer screen. Gelatine silver print, 16”x12”.

My first luminogram exposed by the image displayed on the computer screen. Gelatine silver print, 16”x12”.