FMP - Project developement

There was a really minimal progress during the last weeks. Partially because I was focusing on the proposal but also because it feels like it is time for thinking and perhaps looking at the project from a slightly different perspective. I feel a mixture of the excitement and fear which keeps me engaged with the subject almost all the time but in the same time doesn't allow me to focus on one thing at a time and produce something meaningful. So I am doing what I can without forcing myself and patiently waiting for the "right" time. I am hoping it will happen when I'll go to Falmouth for a week and have the unlimited time to focus, experiment, think, read, etc. 

I got a couple of thoughts today about how to approach the subject from the different perspective. I could visualise some dualities by printing the image on different materials/textures. Using the popular in the book cover design glossy overlay on some part of the image could work well, and also the print on various fabrics and metal.

I work with the photographs of the decaying bee which I observe and photograph for a couple of weeks now. I find those images beautiful and touching for some reason. Perhaps it is the contrast between the disquieting feeling triggered by the shape of the decomposing insect and the stillness, irreversability and inevitability of its death, the another stage in the constant flow of matter. I am interested in that disintegration happening in front of my eyes in a visually attractive form. The dead bee is floating in a glass container together with other small insects, pieces of plants and dust. It all slowly melt and mix together being an amazing example of the transciency in nature.

The body of insect is decomposing and blending with water but it is hardly a fluid of a dead particles. I took a sample of that water and looked at it under microscope. There is a lively world of simple organisms there, the seemingly dead matter is in fact full of live, just in a different scale which is visible to us through the macroscopic lens.